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The golden age of downloading comes to an end


scottieking
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I ALSO HEARD THIS BAD NEWS SK and i looked in to chatham's cable server and it turns out that they wil set up an accont for 10mb. in doing so we can consolidate our internet and cable bills and get a discount. all this at the same price and they claim to be twice as fast. so i say fuck you bell sympatico! [Cool]

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Just called mountain cable. They said they are aware of the "bit capping" occuring w/ sympatico, but are currently not following suit.

But also said, don't discount it ever happening...

I'm pissed...thats ok, i know the price of computer networking, and if some dumb high end companies want to pull shit like this, you'll see personal T1 and T3 connections and other private companies doing LAN stuff...

well see...

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Okay, so I certainly don't know that much about the topic, but it seems to me that if we're being charged even for our uploads, that people will stop sharing their stuff. Is this the beginning of the demise of things like DC? I for one like to share stuff, but can honestly see myself unchecking the "allow uploads" box if it's going to cost me moola. That sucks ass.

Am I computing this properly?

As if anyone would try to make money off the internet. Sheesh. [Roll Eyes]

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2 Tinkerers Say They've Found a Cheap Way to Broadband

By JOHN MARKOFF

CUPERTINO, Calif., June 7 — Anyone looking for the next big thing in Silicon Valley should stop here at Layne Holt's garage.

Mr. Holt and his business partner, John Furrier, both software engineers, have started a company with a shoestring budget and an ambitious target: the cable and phone companies that currently hold a near-monopoly on high-speed access for the "last mile" between the Internet and the home.

At the core of their plan is the inexpensive wireless data standard known as Wi-Fi or 802.11b, which is already shaking up the communications industry, threatening to undermine the business plans of cellular phone companies by offering a much cheaper method for mobile access to the Internet.

The pair's company, known as Etherlinx, has taken the 802.11b standard and used it to build a system that can transmit Internet data up to 20 miles at high speeds — enough to blanket entire urban regions and make cable or D.S.L. connections obsolete.

Their secret weapon is a technology known as a "software-designed radio," which has permitted them to create an inexpensive repeater antenna that can be attached to the outside of a customer's home. The device, which the Etherlinx executives said they believe can be built in quantity for less than $150 each, would communicate with a central antenna and then convert the signals into the industry-standard Wi-Fi, or wireless fidelity, signal for reception inside the home.

Because of the staggering costs of wiring the nation's homes for high-speed networking, only 7 percent, or 7.5 million homes, now have high-speed Internet access, according to a February report from the Federal Communications Commission.

The two Etherlinx executives say they have a religious fervor to change that by making broadband available widely and cheaply.

"We're bandwidth junkies, and I can't imagine a world in which people don't have broadband," Mr. Furrier said. "That's our mission."

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I've been on a rampage since I purchased a spool of CD's (50) from London Drugs for what I thought was a good deal ($29.95) until I arrived at the register and saw another $10.50 'copy levy' added to the bill! Considering I only burn my own music or live shows (all uncopyrighted) music) I found this to be a complete crock-o-bull.

Now they want to gouge you w/ charging for downloading as well - they're double-dipping!

I wrote a long-winded e-mail to all the associations involved (there's a lot of them) in conceiving this 'copy-levy' moneygrab. I will post their response on the Skank when (or if...)I get one.

[Mad][Mad]

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....got the ill communication...

I thought it was federal...

Here's where I got the list of associations to e-mail: click here

Lots of more info here: click here

this is interesting.... (from the above link)

"Retail stores do NOT have to "collect the tax" - the levy is built into their wholesale price

Canada Customs does NOT have to collect the levy at the border if you import blank audio recording media

Canada Post (or any other courier) does NOT have to collect the levy from you if you import blank audio recording media

You do NOT have to remit the levy UNLESS you sell blank audio recording media. So if you import CD-Rs, write data to them, and ship them to customers, they are NOT subject to the levy."

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Move to New Brunswick is right.

There's no capping yet, and in my opinion, never will be. NBNet used to cap their Vibe High Speed Internet at 25 gigs a month, but when Rogers rolled to town, they couldn't keep up. They got rid of it, and now it's a stand off between the two, neither of them wanting to do it first. I doubt either of them will because they will lose their business.

Benefit from the fighting. Move to New Brunswick, uncapped for all.

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