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didn't think it could ever happen


rubberdinghy
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There is really no way to completely protect yourself, actually. There are actual machines, IN STORES that can record your number and the PIN you entered (although I would doubt you'd find them at a large chain, but you never know who owns the specific franchise). From those data, it is simple enough to produce a new card and use it.

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This happened to me a few months ago. I had to go in and get a new bankcard and pin immediately. I suggest you do the same dude.

It SUCKED but the bank reimbursed me for the money that was stolen.

Now I NEVER use bank machines or interac machines...I only go into the ATM that is at my bank.

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Last night trying to take money out at the bar, the machine said will not accept my card. Found, out this morning that they suspected someone of copying my card and disabled my account. Just got a new card and pin and luckily foudn out no money was taken from my account.

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Basically any time your card is out of sight it could be done. It's not so much people taking your debit information as people using a little skimmer the size of often a palm pilot with an optical card reader. Your card is taken below the counter for a moment- they swipe it and through corrupt contacts they also have blanks and marry the two.

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just some info to add:

point 1:

hopefully all of us here already know that emails arriving from banking institutions (I even got one from PayPal) asking you to click on a link and confirm a password (or sometimes just even confirm bank balance) are all bogus! What's so disturbing is that these clever theives play on the "stolen ID" fear by claiming this is exactly the reason why you need to log in and verify that everything is okay. They steal/copy the bank's logo and usually the email is well-worded enough to be convincing (unlike like the overseas "I'm-a-deposed-king-and-have-a-$40 million dollar-favour to-ask-of you" emails. ***)

remember that NO financial institution will ever contact you by phone or email...only by regular (sometimes, registered) mail.

point 2:

Financial institutions actively track and try to prevent ID theft/fraud b/c it costs them. DO take precautions, DO monitor you balances frequently, but know that, while it's a huge inconvenience to have things go wrong, [Dingy, I'd like to add it sucks RANCID, crusty balls...and I'm so sorry, 'bro!], your bank will help you out. Like Jakis, I unexpectedly received notice (in the mail) of suspected fraud on my credit card (no mysterious charges ever showed up) but they sent a new card and instructions on how to activate it; thereby de-activating the old one.

point 3:

apparently "ID theft insurance" being offered by some credit card companies are not worth the money for what they provide. Your bank is already bound to cover any losses. In this same interview on fraud, I also learned the value of checking one's credit rating/history every 6 months by requesting it from Equifax (online request is $15.50) but it's FREE by mail just print off this pdf request form

People can reconstruct enough data about you from going through your paper recycling, request credit cards, open accounts, etc, intercept them before you get them, re-direct the bills, and you will not know until a collection agency comes a-calling that someone has done this to you. Tracking your credit history through Equifax is therefore a pro-active step. So, also, of course is shredding paper documents or removing the personal data parts and throwing them out separately.

***

to hopefully enjoy the lighter side of this, I propose we save and re-post some of those overseas requests...I haven't seen a good one in awhile. I'll dig through my inbox to see what I can find....

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My account got hacked into through online banking. I caught it when I randonly was checking my accounts and noticed a large amount pending transfer from one account to another. I called the bank right away and asked how this transfer got through because I sure didn't do it! They told me there was also a transfer pending to an account somewhere in the States! Long story short, I caught it in time, I didn't lose any money, and I got a new account!

If you do online banking, be careful and don't use public computers. I think the computer I was using had one of those key-stroke recording applications on it. Lesson learned.

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someone copied my bank card and has used it!!!

Emptying my account!!!

BULLSHIT

Wow, that really sucks RD...Howler had her account pilferred last year and I'm thinking more and more of this as I use my bank cards so much, both for our business (scary) and personal...

Will your bank credit the money back to you?...for all the bullshit service charges we pay I hope they do...

Damn that sucks...just the invasion of privacy is a pisser!!! }:(

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remember that NO financial institution will ever contact you by phone or email...only by regular (sometimes, registered) mail.

They do. Well, PC financial calls me when I miss a payment on my Line of Credit.

The weird thing though is that they always call and say "for your protection we need to ask you the following questions" and proceed to ask me my birthdate and mailing address.

I do think that is backwards these days. For MY protection I should be asking THEM questions to verify THEIR identity, especially if they are the ones calling me.

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I had exactly that situation when the CRA called me to talk about my taxes. They wanted to ask all kinds of questions to confirm my identity. I said, "But you phoned me." Eventually, we agreed to disagree, and since I wouldn't answer their questions, they wouldn't discuss my taxes with me. I then phoned them back on my schedule to find out what the problem was (which, luckily, turned out to be nothing).

I wouldn't "confirm" my identity by giving out personal information to someone who phones me; never.

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