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This is just nauseating...


StoneMtn
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NEW YORK, Oct 26 (Reuters Life!) - A new fast food is making its debut at U.S. fairs this fall -- fried Coke.

Abel Gonzales, 36, a computer analyst from Dallas, tried about 15 different varieties before coming up with his perfect recipe -- a batter mix made with Coca-Cola syrup, a drizzle of strawberry syrup, and some strawberries.

Balls of the batter are then deep-fried, ending up like ping-pong ball sized doughnuts which are then served in a cup, topped with Coca-Cola syrup, whipped cream, cinnamon sugar and a cherry on the top.

"It tastes great," said Sue Gooding, a spokeswoman for the State Fair of Texas where Gonzales' fried Coke made its debut this fall. "It was a huge success."

Gonzales ran two stands at the State Fair of Texas and sold up to 35,000 fried Cokes over 24 days for $4.50 each -- and won a prize for coming up with "most creative" new fair food.

Now other fairs in North Carolina and Arizona are following the trend, and other people are trying to emulate Gonzales' recipe.

Gonzales gave no indication of the calories in his creation and said he would not patent it.

"The best I can hope for is that it's the original and hopefully the best fried Coke out there," he said.

But Gonzales said the success of his fried Coke had inspired him. Next year's fair-goers can look forward to fried Sprite or -- for those watching their weight -- fried diet Coke.

"We are trying to cut a lot of the sugar out of it. It has less calories but it's still very, very sweet," he said.

Ray Crockett, a spokesman for Coca-Cola Co., said: "We're constantly amazed at the creative ways folks find to enjoy their Coke and make it part of celebrations like fairs and festivals. This is one is definitely different!"

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As a nice counterpoint to this story, I just saw this -

New York City Begins Hearing on Trans-Fat Ban

Last Updated: Monday, October 30, 2006 | 9:44 AM ET

The Associated Press

New York City's Board of Health will hold its first public hearing on a proposal to make New York the first U.S. city to ban restaurants from serving food containing artificial trans fats.

The average American eats 4.7 pounds of trans fatty acids a year, according to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. New York City health officials say these trans fats are so unhealthy they belong in the same category as food spoiled by rodent droppings.

New York eateries are now scrambling for ways to get trans fats out of their food. Invented in the early 1900s, partially hydrogenated vegetable oil was initially believed to be a healthy substitute for natural fats like butter or lard. It was also cheaper, performed better under high heat and had a longer shelf life. Today, it is used for deep frying and as a shortening in baked goods such as cookies and crackers.

Ironically, many fast food companies became dependent on hydrogenated oil about 15 years ago when they were pressured by health groups to do something about saturated fat. McDonald's emptied its fryers of beef tallow in 1990 and filled them with what was then thought to be "heart healthy" partially hydrogenated vegetable oil.

Raise bad cholesterol

Trans fats significantly raise the level of so-called "bad" cholesterol in the blood, clogging arteries and causing heart disease. Researchers at Harvard's School of Public Health estimated that trans fats contribute to 30,000 U.S. deaths a year.

"This is something we'd like to dismiss from our food supply," said Dr. Robert H. Eckel, immediate past president of the American Heart Association.

Wendy's, the national burger chain, has already switched to a zero-trans fat oil. McDonald's announced in 2003 that it intended to do so, but has yet to follow through.

In Canada companies are required to list trans fats, along with other nutritional information on all pre-packaged foods and drinks but restaurants and bakeries do not have to disclose any nutritional information, including whether their products contain trans fats.

In 2004, Health Canada appointed a task force to investigate finding alternatives to trans fats. Pat Martin, an NDP MP who passed a 2004 motion asking Parliament to enact an all-encompassing trans fat ban, criticized Health Canada for not acting on the task force's report. He said public demand is overwhelming and industry has shown a willingness to change.

Martin dismissed critics who say the government shouldn't intervene in the trans fat debate.

"Nobody is saying that you can't have your doughnuts or your french fries. All we're saying is don't put poison in our food," he told CBC.

Grocery stores not affected

If approved, New York's ban would only affect restaurants, not grocery stores, and wouldn't extend beyond the city limits. But experts said the city's food service industry, with 24,600 establishments, is so large that any rule change is likely to ripple nationwide.

"It's going to be the trendsetter for the entire country," said Suzanne Vieira, director of the culinary nutrition program at Johnson & Wales University in Providence, R.I.

Richard Lipsky, a spokesman for the Neighborhood Retail Alliance, said many New York eatery owners rely on ingredients prepared elsewhere, and aren't always aware whether the foods they sell contain trans fats. Consumer reaction remains to be seen.

New Jersey state Sen. Ellen Karcher said her office was flooded with threatening phone calls after she proposed a similar trans fat ban in early October. A proposed ban in Chicago was ridiculed by some as government paternalism run amok.

Dr. Leslie Cho, medical director for preventative cardiology and rehabilitation at the Cleveland Clinic, said people might be less upset if they knew how bad trans fats are for the body.

"I don't know anything about politics, but what I tell my patients is that they should not eat any type of artificial trans fat," she said.

Do they listen?

"The majority of the people I deal with have had stents or bypass surgery," she said. "They are kind of motivated to change their lives."

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Gonzales...said he would not patent it.

He's an idiot. Once Krisy Kreme gets wind of this' date=' and figures out how to make them, they'll make huge amounts of money; if he could patent it, he'd be able to license the patent to them, and get a share.

Aloha,

Brad[/quote']

wouldn't he have to get permission from coca-cola to patent a product that they own?

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Gonzales...said he would not patent it.

He's an idiot. Once Krisy Kreme gets wind of this' date=' and figures out how to make them, they'll make huge amounts of money; if he could patent it, he'd be able to license the patent to them, and get a share.

Aloha,

Brad[/quote']

wouldn't he have to get permission from coca-cola to patent a product that they own?

He wouldn't be patenting a product, he'd be patenting a process for creating a product, and the patent could easily be phrased to avoid mention of Coca Cola (syrup), but still cover any process that used it. (As well, he wouldn't be patenting a process for making Coca Cola, he'd be patenting a process in which Coca Cola was just one ingredient.)

Standard disclaimer: I'm not a lawyer, but have read a bunch of patents (several of which are on my desk right now).

Aloha,

Brad

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the thought of waiting for your food to float in a vat of grease is gross. food that is see-through because of the grease is gross too. knowing how unhealthy coke is, coupled with deep-fried grossness, is really, really, really gross. i'd like to do a serious sociological study on the people who line up at this counter.

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food that is see-through because of the grease is gross too.

363px-Dr_Nick.png

(To Homer in "King-Size Homer")

Dr. Nick: "Now there are many options available for dangerously underweight individuals like yourself. I recommend a slow steady gorging process combined with assal horizontology. You'll want to focus on the neglected food groups, such as the whipped group, the congealed group and the choc-o-tastic. Be creative. Instead of making sandwiches with bread, use Pop-Tarts. Instead of chewing gum, chew bacon."

Bart: "You could brush your teeth with milkshakes!"

Dr. Nick: "Hey, did you go to Hollywood Upstairs Medical College too?"......

......"If you're not sure about something, rub it against a piece of paper. If the paper turns clear, it's your window to weight-gain."

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