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The power of music


Moma
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I thought i would share my experience with this community because I know many people will appreciate this. I am currently writing my thesis at a rehabilitation facility for individuals with traumatic brain injury in Colorado. For my thesis I have written a program to assist a man with amnesia (on good days he remembers his sons names), he really has very limited memory.As I learned more about him, I found out that he was a crazy Dead Head. So, between trials I give him breaks where we just listen to Dead tunes. To my amazement one day he busted out singing all the words to Ripple. It was mind blowing to the point it gave me goosebumps and it brought to tears. What was even more remarkable, is that his accident also left him with impaired speech, but I was able to understand exactly what he was singing, and he was able to sing in sync with Jerry. A feel privileged to have witnessed it.It just shows you the power of music.

Happy B-Day CH

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I think there is something about different parts of the brain being used for speaking and singing? I think I remember reading something about that one time, but I could be wrong. I used to work with a guy who had a mild but definitely noticeable stutter which completely disappeared whenever he would sing.

Either way, cool story.

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I think there is something about different parts of the brain being used for speaking and singing? I think I remember reading something about that one time, but I could be wrong. I used to work with a guy who had a mild but definitely noticeable stutter which completely disappeared whenever he would sing.

I've heard the same thing. My grandmother on my Mom's side had a stroke, and was stricken with "aphasia", which is the inability to process language; you could ask her what day it was, and she knew it was Wednesday, it's just that the part of her brain that knew it was Wednesday and the part of her brain that controlled her vocal chords to speak the word "Wednesday" didn't work and play with each other. But she could sing: start in on, say, "Row Row Row Your Boat" and she'd chime in, with the sung words perfectly understandable. It was as if there was a part of her brain the controlled her vocal chords to speak words (which was affected by her stroke), and a different part of her brain that controlled her vocal chords to sing words (which wasn't affected by her stroke).

Aloha,

Brad

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I thought i would share my experience with this community because I know many people will appreciate this. I am currently writing my thesis at a rehabilitation facility for individuals with traumatic brain injury in Colorado. For my thesis I have written a program to assist a man with amnesia (on good days he remembers his sons names), he really has very limited memory.As I learned more about him, I found out that he was a crazy Dead Head. So, between trials I give him breaks where we just listen to Dead tunes. To my amazement one day he busted out singing all the words to Ripple. It was mind blowing to the point it gave me goosebumps and it brought to tears. What was even more remarkable, is that his accident also left him with impaired speech, but I was able to understand exactly what he was singing, and he was able to sing in sync with Jerry. A feel privileged to have witnessed it.It just shows you the power of music.

Thank you. Shit, that just sent shivers up my spine just reading it. Best of luck on future successes with him.

Have you figured out what years he may have attended a lot of shows?? Maybe some live recordings from then, or even a specific show he was at would really trigger something.

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How interesting that it was Ripple. I was just reading the lyrics while thinking about that story and it's really fitting. Thanks for sharing.

If my words did glow with the gold of sunshine

And my tunes were played on the harp unstrung,

Would you hear my voice come thru the music,

Would you hold it near as it were your own?

Its a hand-me-down, the thoughts are broken,

Perhaps theyre better left unsung.

I dont know, dont really care

Let there be songs to fill the air.

Ripple in still water,

When there is no pebble tossed,

Nor wind to blow.

Reach out your hand if your cup be empty,

If your cup is full may it be again,

Let it be known there is a fountain,

That was not made by the hands of men.

There is a road, no simple highway,

Between the dawn and the dark of night,

And if you go no one may follow,

That path is for your steps alone.

Ripple in still water,

When there is no pebble tossed,

Nor wind to blow.

But if you fall you fall alone,

If you should stand then whos to guide you?

If I knew the way I would take you home.

La dee da da da, la da da da da, da da da, da da, da da da da da

La da da da, la da da, da da, la da da da, la da, da da.

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No he used to be able to play the guitar, but his accident has left him with limited use of his right arm.

What is even more remarkable is that he is also aphasic, so he has difficulties enunciating words and tends not to speak because his voice is very distorted. But I could make out every word he was singing. It was great.

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I ended up with a traumatic brain injury when I saw 'The Dead' just outside of Syracuse in 2003 or whatever year it was. See? I dont even know what year it was much less know what city I was in!

Was it with Willie Nelson and moe.? If so, it was June 29, 2003, at Vernon Downs in Vernon, NY.

Aloha,

Brad

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Moma - awesome story, thanks! Great way to start the day

I think there is something about different parts of the brain being used for speaking and singing? I think I remember reading something about that one time, but I could be wrong. I used to work with a guy who had a mild but definitely noticeable stutter which completely disappeared whenever he would sing.

Yeah, different parts of the brain. From the opposite side, someone close to me has severe progressive MS without remissions. The one thing that he loves as much as music itself is singing (and he used to do a mean Elvis impersonation). He can speak fine, but just simply can not find a way or figure out how to sing.

But not a complete bummer -- on a recent trip to Ireland, he busted out a "Danny Boy"! So hope lives eternal :)

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