Jump to content
Jambands.ca

Wayne Coyne hates Arcade Fire


skelter
 Share

Recommended Posts

C'mon, Jaimoe, that's not ALL you know. Give yourself some credit. Frinstince, you know that ABB is not ABB without Dickie.

oh hell yes they are. I love Dicky as much as the next ABB fan, and it SUCKS he is no longer with them, but the lineup they have now is one of the BEST they have had in a 40 year career.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i don't know win, but i've had the pleasure of hanging out with jeremy on a number of occasions both around and outside of arcade fire and he is one of the nicest people around. i have a hard time believing that they're all assholes.

Unless I was way more jet-lagged than I remember, I hope I was less of a 'prick' than telling Rollingstone that a bunch of people I don't know at all are really assholes.

Excellent retort.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

i don't know win, but i've had the pleasure of hanging out with jeremy on a number of occasions both around and outside of arcade fire and he is one of the nicest people around. i have a hard time believing that they're all assholes.

Jeremy is cool. He was the only one that was on time for the gig. I found Win to be very unfriendly and Richard wasn't too thrilling a person either. Helluva show though.

I booked them to play Clark Hall for $350. $7 tickets, turned away a couple of hundred people.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

C'mon' date=' Jaimoe, that's not ALL you know. Give yourself some credit. Frinstince, you know that ABB is not ABB without Dickie.[/quote']

oh hell yes they are. I love Dicky as much as the next ABB fan, and it SUCKS he is no longer with them, but the lineup they have now is one of the BEST they have had in a 40 year career.

As musicians that is arguably true. But Warren, Derek and whoever sits in with the band didn't help create a sound, a genre, or influence several generations, not to mention help produce transcendent albums. Substitutions are all well and good, but they can never replace original soul.

On an aside, the second-best ABB line-up was: Dickey Betts, Greg Allman, Butch Trucks, Marc Quinones, Warren Haynes and the irreplaceable Allen Woody. If Woody and Haynes didn't join the fold when they did, the Allman Brothers would have faded into the sunset (as Skynyrd should have done after the plane crash).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

George: Hi.

Susan: Hello.

Bubble Boy: Who are you?, Where's Seinfeld?.

Mom: he's on his way, these are his friends.

Bubble Boy: What are you looking at?, never seen a kid in a bubble before?.

George: Pfft, Of course I have, come on my Cousin's in a bubble, you know I've got a lot of bubble.

Bubble Boy: What's your story?.

Susan: I have no story.

George: She works for NBC.

Bubble Boy: How bout taking your top off?.

pa_wayne_coyne_crowdsurf420.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

C'mon' date=' Jaimoe, that's not ALL you know. Give yourself some credit. Frinstince, you know that ABB is not ABB without Dickie.[/quote']

oh hell yes they are. I love Dicky as much as the next ABB fan, and it SUCKS he is no longer with them, but the lineup they have now is one of the BEST they have had in a 40 year career.

As musicians that is arguably true. But Warren, Derek and whoever sits in with the band didn't help create a sound, a genre, or influence several generations, not to mention help produce transcendent albums. Substitutions are all well and good, but they can never replace original soul.

On an aside, the second-best ABB line-up was: Dickey Betts, Greg Allman, Butch Trucks, Marc Quinones, Warren Haynes and the irreplaceable Allen Woody. If Woody and Haynes didn't join the fold when they did, the Allman Brothers would have faded into the sunset (as Skynyrd should have done after the plane crash).

Agreed, on all counts. That line-up was truly remarkable and easily TIED for second best with the current line up. I love Allan Woody and his work during his tenure easily demonstrated his spot as TIED for 2nd best bassist in the Allmans. I think Oteil brings something to the band that allows them to push and explore musical areas that Dickey would not have wanted them to take, ie in a very noticeably jazz direction. The Allmans now will often tease any number of jazz standards during jams and its the language spoken most often between Derek and Oteil, something not found (nearly as much if at all) during the Betts/Woody era. I agree Dickey helped define and shape that movement, but one of Duane's passions was jazz and Oteil represents a much fuller version of how the Allmans can incorporate the styles and textures of jazz into a blues-based sound. After having seen both versions (90's Allan Woody and 00's Oteil) many times, I would say they are equals in value when it comes to the carrying on the tradition. And I fuckin loved Dickey Betts in the 90's.

oh and J.....go and see Dr. Dog. So fuckin worth it.

Edited by Guest
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dickey is into jazz. He was inspired to write Jessica in a Django style. Both Duane and Dickey loved Coltrane too, and Dickey's lead style is pretty jazzy, even back to the Fillmore days. And Jaimoe is a jazz drummer, so the ABB have always had the jazz influence anchoring their sound.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

right. And rambling man was their most jazzy adventure? I think despite Dickey's claims, his jazz influence wasn't as strong as his country and blues ones. What has Dickey done as a solo artist that is even remotely jazz? His jazz input was Liz Reed. Jessica was as much Gregg and Chuck Levell as it was Dickey. Though I agree on Duane and Dickey's shared love of Coltrane and Miles. And his soloing style is certainly jazzy.

But the Betts/Woody era wasn't even remotely as close to jazz as the current one is. Derek is a student of jazz more than most other styles, as is Oteil. The same cannot be said of Betts or Woody, though I think listening to Woody you can hear a huge jazz influence. Would the Betts/Woody ABB covered Naima? I don't think so, and in fact, I know they didn't.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did Wayne rip off Peter Gabriel with the bubble or was it the other way around?

Anyone know?

Maybe Gabriel should get a hate on for Wayne. A lot of major artists are douchebags in person. I'm sure Wayne has his moments and I think he comes off as a fuckin' loser in that interview.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

right. And rambling man was their most jazzy adventure? I think despite Dickey's claims, his jazz influence wasn't as strong as his country and blues ones. What has Dickey done as a solo artist that is even remotely jazz? His jazz input was Liz Reed. Jessica was as much Gregg and Chuck Levell as it was Dickey. Though I agree on Duane and Dickey's shared love of Coltrane and Miles. And his soloing style is certainly jazzy.

But the Betts/Woody era wasn't even remotely as close to jazz as the current one is. Derek is a student of jazz more than most other styles, as is Oteil. The same cannot be said of Betts or Woody, though I think listening to Woody you can hear a huge jazz influence. Would the Betts/Woody ABB covered Naima? I don't think so, and in fact, I know they didn't.

Most of the Betts-penned instrumentals such as "Pegasus", "Les Brers in A Minor" and "Kind of Bird" have jazz leanings, especially the latter Charlie Parker inspired tune. And parts of Betts' solos on "Whipping Post" and "Mountain Jam" on Live at the Fillmore have jazz stylings.

Duane may have been influenced by jazz, but his lead playing rarely strayed from blues. Even his solos on the Push Push album are blues-based. I've played bluesy guitar for over 20 years and Duane is my biggest lead guitar influence. His style is easier to emmulate than Dickey's because, one, he died at 23 and two, he was a killer blues player that embraced the genre and took it as far as it could go. I don't have a country/bluegrass mentality, but I certainly can get into Warren's headspace, since he is blues to the core. I'm afraid of that Trucks kid though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Did Wayne rip off Peter Gabriel with the bubble or was it the other way around?

gabriel did it long before the lips. probably before the lips were gigging in places big enough for a plastic ball.

i think gary larson's (far side) cow ball beat them all to it though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The entire fucking premise of Arcade Fire is pompousness. They're ridiculously ponzi preening art school types that might best be described as faggotish.

...And Win Butler is INCREDIBLY pompous in person, which by its very essence means he has no insight into that whatsoever. I'm sure they get scores of sunshine blown up their ass and went from being awkward indie musicians to world class premadonnas with little time to transition a working personality. Did I mention I hate that fucking band and everything they stand for and good on Wayne Coyne for calling them out. Seriously though Wayne would know the guy has an almost zen like humility about him and certainly must know how to judge a personality, I have no doubt about what he says about Beck negatively or positively about the Edge or JT either. Good on him.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
And just like that, the Rock Feud of 2009 fizzles out. Back in March, Flaming Lips leader Wayne Coyne told Rolling Stone that the Arcade Fire are "pricks, so fuck 'em." (Pretty funny.) Then Win Butler responded with relatively mature lines like, "I hope I was less of a 'prick' then telling Rollingstone that a bunch of people I don't know at all are really assholes." (Not as funny, but more respectable, I guess.)

In the world of rock 'n' roll, this means war! Or something. Like any good internet hype fest, people talked about it in bars for one or two days and then promptly forgot about the entire thing. But now we have an addendum-- seems like Wayne never meant to insult Win and his band in the first place. So he says now, at least...

In an Entertainment Weekly interview, Coyne said he wished the incident "never happened." He goes on: "I didn't necessarily mean it about the people in the Arcade Fire. I meant it about the guys that were running their stages at a couple of festivals. I wish whatever had been said wouldn't have been taken as such a defiant statement from the Flaming Lips, because it wasn't...I really feel bad about it. I like enough of their music. The idea that I'm somehow against them...I'm not!"

The whole "I was talking about the dudes running their stages" defense seems suspicious since the original slam had Wayne saying, "Whenever I've been around them, I've found that they not only treated their crew like shit, they treated the audience like shit." Meh.

Now that it's all over, I rate this war of words a solid 7.3 on the P4k beef-o-meter.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

yeah, it really sounds like you're referring to Justin Timberlake or the Edge's crew here :

People treat Arcade Fire like they're the greatest thing ever and they get away with it. Those sort of opinions change my view of their music. They have good tunes, but they're pricks, so fuck 'em. Who does Arcade Fire think they are? I've been around groups. I've been around the Edge from U2 and he's the fucking sweetest guy ever. I was around Justin Timberlake when he was young and he was just a normal, nice, kind person. Anyone can be polite and kind and people who have the privilege and money and attention should understand that. If they don't, then fuck 'em."
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...