Jump to content
Jambands.ca

Furthur 2010


HaMike
 Share

Recommended Posts

Seriously what's the deal with 'Furthur' - is Kreutzman effectively retired retired? So it's Phil, Bobby and his douchey buddy from Ratdog and what now some dude from DSO and admittedly the badass Joe Russo?

??? Seruiously! For one Kruetzman lives in Hawaii and tours only occasionally.

Bobby's buddy from Ratdog is skilled keyboardist Jeff Chenemti, amazing player. The "guy" from DSO is John Kadelecik, who is a mid blowing player how sounds eerily like Jerry.

I have heard the recordings fromt he road of this band and they are far superior to the Dead which toured last summer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll probably check out the Buffalo show if that counts. Chimenti impressed me a great deal at the Dead's Buffalo show last April (despite the fact that I was underwhelmed by the show in general)...Rothbury was MUCH better. And I'll admit the first time I saw DSO I had some serious doubts going into it, but Kadelecik does a VERY respectable job of filling some difficult shoes. I still have a grand old time taking in the music of the Dead on a live stage with some good folk when it's done well. I'm willing to take the chance that there will be some trainwrecks along the way.

I realize it's not for everyone and I'm glad to be able to round out my musical fix through seeing many other great, perhaps more original acts. But the little remnants of 'headnation' that I'm able to bask in keeps me truckin'. I'll take what I can get, and I'm thinking this run of shows will be well worth the short drive to Buffalo.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now that's an honest and apt assessment. I have to admit it's probably worth the drive to Buffalo too it's just the silence spoke volumes. Definitely from The Other Ones to the Dead to Phil and Friends to Furthur (I intentionally left Ratdog off that list) there's been some admirable stabs at the Grateful Dead's ouvre. Players like Kimock, Herring, Ryan Adams, Warren Haynes and on and on have made really worthy admissions. And I must say that the fact that Russo has played with everyone from members of Phish to the Slip, the Dead and motherfuggin' Gene Ween - well shit's alright.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Now that's an honest and apt assessment. I have to admit it's probably worth the drive to Buffalo too it's just the silence spoke volumes. Definitely from The Other Ones to the Dead to Phil and Friends to Furthur (I intentionally left Ratdog off that list) there's been some admirable stabs at the Grateful Dead's ouvre. Players like Kimock, Herring, Ryan Adams, Warren Haynes and on and on have made really worthy admissions. And I must say that the fact that Russo has played with everyone from members of Phish to the Slip, the Dead and motherfuggin' Gene Ween - well shit's alright.

Does this mean we can count on you to be there to help us tear up the rug?

Oh, and Tonin my friend. It has been MUCH too long since we crossed paths. Here's hoping that we'll both actually be able to make it to some of the same shows in the near future. BNB is a DEFINITE for me (as an example).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember when The Wheel was a huge motif to this Deadhead. It meant alot but with all these configurational changes and slop over the better part of the past decade, they might as well call that song The Circle Jerk with Bob eating the proverbial slice of bread in the center.

To be honest, I have listened to a touch of this Further stuff. I expected to hate it.....but it was not bad.

Not bad at all but I'ld sooner go see In And Out Of Practice, Trey Flubs Fantastic.

Edited by Guest
not'd
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's interesting to think whether there will ever be another group whether including members of the original Grateful Dead or not that could ably, psychedelically and credibly ascend the Dead's songbook. Something like a much more ripping Jazz Is Dead or Zappa plays Zappa type thing. The inclusion of Russo was heartening to me from this perspective.

I also wonder how the new players go about learning the songbook which I would expect for touring purposes is about 75 songs. They must have sheet music, I mean obviously the Dead cover guys don't have to worry about that. I wonder if the notations though reflect a certain periods rendition of a song or if that is just a daft assessment. I remember Jimmy Herring talking way back about learning the songbook not so much the Jazz Is Dead book but when he started playing with the boys proper- I always wondered what they worked off of.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

All joking aside now, maybe this will help you gain an slight understanding zero. Its an interview with Jimmy Herring conducted by The Philzone a number of years ago.

VB: Let's talk about Phil & Friends. Most Deadheads are under the impression that because you knew the tunes from Jazz Is Dead that Phil was hip to that but I hear he really liked your playing with ARU.

JH: There were some nice people like J.C. Juanis and people like that who had been trying to get Phil to hire me for a long time before he finally called. They were playing him Jazz Is Dead. I think, if Jazz Is Dead was the reason he was going to hire me, he would've hired me a long time ago. Derek Trucks and Warren Haynes were telling Phil, "You need to talk to Jimmy." Finally, Phil's people called me and said, "Phil would like to hear what you've done other than Jazz Is Dead."

I sent him my only copy of the live ARU album, it's out of print. Then they called me immediately. I went out and rehearsed and when I got there the first day Phil said to me, "Man, I really dig that ARU stuff."

VB: I'm sure it didn't hurt to have the working knowledge of the tunes via Jazz Is Dead just to know where some of the more difficult tunes are going - "Terrapin" and "Unbroken Chain" for example.

JH: Oh, absolutely. It totally helped to have a little bit of an edge knowing a couple of the songs.

VB: What were rehearsals like for that tour?

JH: They were very concentrated. They were very effective and they were very focused.

VB: Does Phil give a lot of verbal philosophy talking about what he's looking for with the band or is it a more organic process where he was leading you more by example with the music? How did it work?

JH: He wants to hear each and every person's personality and he doesn't want you to get tied up in your own space. He wants a "conversation," he doesn't want some guy's blistering solo. That's his whole thing - he doesn't really want any solos. He said, "When you play you are the first among five equals and if you find yourself in your own space for a little while, stop, listen, react." He described his vision of the music as if we were a school of fish - like watch a school of fish when predators come around - safety in numbers, you know, the way they move together. He also compared us to a flock of birds - look at the V formation of birds flying - they might break up for a minute but they fall right back into formation.

VB: Sometimes they switch who's leader... changing places while flying in the same course.

JH: Right. It's very interesting. John Molo heard it described as "psychedelic Dixieland." Which is a great way to describe it. Phil wants everybody playing at the same time. He doesn't want you to fall into the conventional rhythm/lead role and that's hard, man.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think Jimmy is the kind of guy that just absolutely loves music so much that he would try and learn it all in every way shape and form. At least that was the impression he gave when he took over in Panic.

I figure the guy has a guitar in his hands 24/7 unless he's fishing.

As for Furthur. The earlier stuff sounds great - I think they must have done a lot of rehearsals because its not slow like Ratdog or out there to nowhere like PLQ or bluesy from Warren.

I got the impression from listening and talking to people that the goal with this one is to try and get it right, the way it was. Thats probably the reason for DSO Jerry and for Russo (guessing on that last part, but rumour has it Mickey is pretty much deaf and geriatric drummers can't play quick enough to begin with).

As for the "slop" over the last decade - I'll admit that I don't often listen to a lot of the reincarnations after they happen (although some of this past year's The Dead has been in rotation a fair bit) my bigger problem at most of these shows is the crowds. It seems like people show up so often expecting the magic and forgeting all the work we put in to making it magical. It takes a lot of effort and positive energy to make the magic.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It takes a lot of effort and positive energy to make the magic.

I think more than most will agree that first and foremost' date=' it's the music. Its always been about the music. That blue ball of invisible energy has to start somewhere. You can walk in with the best intentions but that wont be enough.[/quote']

I'd be curious as to what people think on this. I don't hear a lot of people championing 1992-95 as the best years of the Grateful Dead, but I know an aweful lot of people that put that period down as the best concerts they've ever been to.

In other words, the boys were flubbing through mistakes and mis-directions etc. just like all the post-jerry formations have. It says here that the difference is that 20,000 or 75,000 people went in with ear to ear smiles, expecting, demanding, and having the time of their lives.

Now they walk in clouded with negativity about the missing man, or holding up the mini-picture of Jer and pretending his on stage, or doing something else that plants the seed of doubt in the venue and prevents the magic from happening.

Maybe its more about the songs then the music.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, and Tonin my friend. It has been MUCH too long since we crossed paths. Here's hoping that we'll both actually be able to make it to some of the same shows in the near future. BNB is a DEFINITE for me (as an example).

The feeling is mutual edger. I'm in for BNB.

Booche, thanks for posting that interview with JH. I remember reading it before, or something similiar to it, but it was refreshing to read it again as it captures so nicely the approach taken by Phil, which I love.

I've seen DSO a few times and JK's playing is much closer to Jerry's playing than any of the players that have played with The Dead, Phil or Ratdog. I remember when Jerry died, the view of most fans was that Jerry couldn't be replaced (which he obviously can't) and any guitar player who stepped in to fill his shoes shouldn't try to emulate Jerry. I agreed with that view at the time but am now thinking that it will be nice to hear the band with a player who sounds like Jerry.

And Joe Russo is a killer drummer ... what a great choice for this band.

Peace, Mark

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I remember when Jerry died, the view of most fans was that Jerry couldn't be replaced (which he obviously can't) and any guitar player who stepped in to fill his shoes shouldn't try to emulate Jerry. I agreed with that view at the time but am now thinking that it will be nice to hear the band with a player who sounds like Jerry.

Agreed! That was a huge deciding factor in all the incarnations up until now. Sufficient time has passed, and there's a craving for a hint of Jerry's tone while the music is playing on stage.

I simply love the fact that there are always new elements being brought to the music that will survive much furthur than any of the surviving members.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...