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Winter reading

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My Kobo is broken so it looks like I'm going to have to buy some old fashioned books to take on vacation next week.

Has anyone read anything good lately? Classics, new release, biographies-I'm open to all suggestions.

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A Song of Ice and Fire.

First Book: Game of Thrones.

This series has completely taken over my summer.

Currently on the most recent volume, A Dance with Dragons, and I really don't want to finish it because who has any clue when George RR Martin will finish the series.

Prior to starting this I finished Drood.

drood-simmons.jpg

I thoroughly enjoyed it.

On June 9, 1865, while traveling by train to London with his secret mistress, 53-year-old Charles Dickens--at the height of his powers and popularity, the most famous and successful novelist in the world and perhaps in the history of the world--hurtled into a disaster that changed his life forever.

Did Dickens begin living a dark double life after the accident? Were his nightly forays into the worst slums of London and his deepening obsession with corpses, crypts, murder, opium dens, the use of lime pits to dissolve bodies, and a hidden subterranean London mere research . . . or something more terrifying?

Just as he did in The Terror, Dan Simmons draws impeccably from history to create a gloriously engaging and terrifying narrative. Based on the historical details of Charles Dickens's life and narrated by Wilkie Collins (Dickens's friend, frequent collaborator, and Salieri-style secret rival), DROOD explores the still-unsolved mysteries of the famous author's last years and may provide the key to Dickens's final, unfinished work: The Mystery of Edwin Drood. Chilling, haunting, and utterly original, DROOD is Dan Simmons at his powerful best.

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If you haven't read these yet, grab them all and read them in that order. Awesome books. Easily some of my favourite stories.

They all tie in together and are based on true events, and injustices.

Main subject of the stories.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ihalmiut

The Ihalmiut were largely ignored until author/explorer Farley Mowat visited and lived among them in the 1940s. At the time, they were located between Lake Yathkyed and Lake Ennadai, in the area of the Padlermiut.[10]

Mowat wrote several books about his experiences and the subsequent fate of the Ihalmiut people including People of the Deer and The Desperate People. Based on the oral histories of the people, he estimated that the Ihalmiut had numbered 7,000 in 1886,[12] down to 40 by 1947-48, and by 1950, only 30 remained.[10] Their destruction was due to changes in their hunting dynamics (from hunting for food to hunting for furs), introduction of flour and sugar into their diet (through fur trader contact),[8] disease (probably diphtheria),[5] the failure of their primary food source (barren-ground caribou), and sickened sled dogs (possibly rabies).

People of the deer - Farley Mowat

http://www.ecobooks.com/books/peopdeer.htm

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The Desperate People - Farley Mowat

http://www.ecobooks.com/books/despeop.htm

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Walking on the land - Farley Mowat

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/329539.Walking_on_the_Land

106c_AK-V_Walk.jpg

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I've enjoyed these two this summer:

42a61aa3b5795.jpg

Rockbound

by Frank Parker Day

A great story of family feud and the struggle to survive set at the turn of the century on the north shore of Newfoundland.

And I just finished

2030_cover_220.jpg

2030: The Real Story of What Happens to America

by Albert Brooks

A darkly humours dystopia novel about the near future, when we've cured cancer and the economy falls apart.

Lots of good ideas on the list. Thx for the other suggestions.

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I just read a book called Long Way Down, by, is it Nick Hornby? I believe AD might have given it to me, and I'll have to thank him for introducing me to myest new favorite author.

I could not stop laughing, like eyes slammed shut laughing. The book is about four people trying to commit suicide. So very clever is this Nick.

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I just read a book called Long Way Down, by, is it Nick Hornby? I believe AD might have given it to me, and I'll have to thank him for introducing me to myest new favorite author.

I could not stop laughing, like eyes slammed shut laughing. The book is about four people trying to commit suicide. So very clever is this Nick.

He is definitely me favourite contemporary fiction writer. If you haven't read High Fidelity, run to your nearest (independent) bookstore and get it. Seriously, like, now. Also, a fun bonus of reading more than one of his books is that he inserts subtle little self-referential jokes. For example, I just finished reading About a Boy, in which the main character talks about how he loves shopping at Championship Vinyl, which is the fictional record store that is the setting for High Fidelity.

As for other books/authors, a couple of summer highlights for me have been these two:

0676976468.01.LZZZZZZZ.jpg

and

tiger.jpg

Fascinating and twisted non-fiction mystery/adventure stories really well told. Vaillant is expert at intertwining various elements of complicated stories and making them read like a novel.

Another recent favourite, recommended if you're at all interested in contemporary Canadian identity:

MacGregor.jpg

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I just read a book called Long Way Down, by, is it Nick Hornby? I believe AD might have given it to me, and I'll have to thank him for introducing me to myest new favorite author.

I could not stop laughing, like eyes slammed shut laughing. The book is about four people trying to commit suicide. So very clever is this Nick.

That's definitely a good one. Nick Hornby is a great author. My other favourite from him (aside from High Fidelity) is called How To Be Good. Check it out!

As for laughing out loud, I certainly laugh a lot when I read anything by David Sedaris.

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I just read a book called Long Way Down' date=' by, is it Nick Hornby? I believe AD might have given it to me, and I'll have to thank him for introducing me to myest new favorite author.

I could not stop laughing, like eyes slammed shut laughing. The book is about four people trying to commit suicide. So very clever is this Nick.[/quote']

That's definitely a good one. Nick Hornby is a great author. My other favourite from him (aside from High Fidelity) is called How To Be Good. Check it out!

How to be Good is excellent and might be my second favourite of his. Juliet, Naked is also pretty good, and should resonate well with folks around here as it offers up commentary on the geekiness of people who frequent online message boards to talk about obscure musicians that nobody else cares about :laugh: .

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I've been on a Christopher Moore bender - Lamb, Fluke and Fool stand out as my faves so far....funny as hell and the first books in a long time where I've checked to see how long the next chapter is, then stayed up an hour too late to finish 3 more...

Lamb is absolutely awesome! I've only read one or two of his other books (titles elude me right now, eight beers into my evening), but none of them made me laugh as hard as Lamb did.

I'm also a big proponent of John Irving, even though he seems to have a recurring theme of "young boy, older woman" running through an awful lot of his novels. The World According to Garp and A Prayer For Owen Meany are obvious places to start, but I have pretty much found all of his novels enjoyable.

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