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QotD: Any war veterans in your family?


Davey Boy 2.0
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My dad was in the Navy in WW II. He operated the telegraph (morse code).

He never told me any "war stories"...he only ever talked about funny things that happened or friends he'd made..and while he paid his Legion dues every year, he never hung out there as he wasn't interested in reliving or talking about the fighting/death/destruction he'd witnessed.

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Hey Davey Boy, I too had a relative who fought on the Plains of Abraham!!! Wild. I was talking to my grandmother about it the other month. She was watching some (Canadian) show on TV where they investigate items people find in their attics, or family heirlooms that they don't know the history behind. In this one episode they were tracking somebody's relative back to the Plains of Abraham and they were figuring out who all the people were in some famous painting from the time. She was hoping that a family name would pop up to link it to us, but it didn't :(

My grandfather served (Army) in Korea and then in UN work in Japan and the Congo.

My other grandfather served as an officer in the Navy during WWII on a minesweeper. Spent time in the Atlantic out of Halifax. Minesweepers weren't huge vessels and they got tossed around a lot in the open Atlantic. He was then stationed at HMCS York in Toronto (i have his desk from back then). When the War was over, all employee's at Eaton's were presented with a gold ring for thanks. Ever since he died, I wear it every day.

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My Great-Grandfather fought in WW1. He fought in some pretty famous battles. My Grandfather fought in WW2, was overseas for a bit and stationed in Labrador operating artillery. My Other Grandfather was a Navy mechanic in Sydney, NS during WW2. My little brother was also in Canadian Navy for about 7 years and he's now an officer in the Army, based in Petawawa.

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My grandparents on my mother's side lived in Holland during the war and my Opa would talk about the things they had to do to get by (tearing up railway tracks for fuel to burn) but didn't often mention the more grisly experiences.

I guess we all have a very general feel for the depths to which humanity can plunge but when you see it first hand I would guess it's a profoundly different thing

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1. my grandpa on my mom's side [american] was the captain of a minesweeper in the south pacific. he wasn't supposed to be the captain but his superiors got court martialed for some misbehaving! i think the navy was a lot less crazy than infantry as far as witnessing so much violence.

2. i took my history class to see passchendaele... the love story is definitely OVERDONE. it is about 2 hours long, and about one whole hour in the middle of the movie is just in calgary following the love story. but, the war scenes are good, if a bit brutal. that's war i guess. i thought it did a good job of depicting just how awful it was in the trenches, especially with all the mud and rain they had at passchendaele. a renter i think. and paul gross is actually pretty cute.

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Guest Low Roller

Both my Grandfathers were officers in the Polish army when WWII broke out. Both managed to avoid the mass Soviet execution of Polish officers in Katyn and also managed to avoid being sent out to the gulags and concentration camps.

I don't really know specific stories of their wartime ordeals, but they both survived the war.

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My father's father and his father were both photographers in WWII in the German Army.

Today is my father's birthday.

I feel deeply on Armistice Day and I'm thankful for all Canadian Veterans.

I should add that I've also had several generations of Metis and Quebecois family serve.

Cheers to all who risk for us.

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My great-grandfather (who died when I was about 12) had the odd distinction of serving in both WWI and WWII - he was just old enough to volunteer the first time, and just young enough to be accepted when he volunteered the second time. I know that he was at Vimy Ridge, and I can remember him telling us about mustard gas attacks.

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Both my Grandfathers were officers in the Polish army when WWII broke out. Both managed to avoid the mass Soviet execution of Polish officers in Katyn and also managed to avoid being sent out to the gulags and concentration camps.

I don't really know specific stories of their wartime ordeals, but they both survived the war.

This was a horrible atrocity. I lived across the street from the Katyn Memorial in Toronto (a few houses down). It's quite the powerful sculpture and there is barbed wire sculpted into the ground beneath it. I recall walking by one evening when they were having a memorial service and talking to some of the Polish mourners. They were so kind and were more than happy to educate me on what it was all about.

Jankowski_katyn1.jpg

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My grandparents on my mother's side lived in Holland during the war and my Opa would talk about the things they had to do to get by (tearing up railway tracks for fuel to burn) but didn't often mention the more grisly experiences.

I guess we all have a very general feel for the depths to which humanity can plunge but when you see it first hand I would guess it's a profoundly different thing

My Opa fought in Holland too, he was a POW. He is 96 and still wont really talk about it...he has talk about moving here with his kids and the devastation following a war.

Where did your grandparents settle in Canada? (I assume they moved to Canada?)

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My dad was an army brat.

Both my grandparents (still alive today) were stationed in Australia in WWII.Grandma was a truck driver and grandpa was a radar technician. He went on teaching in the army for many decades afterward. They met and married there.

My great uncle (grandma's brother) was killed by the Japanese in a Thai internment camp near the river Kwai. My grandma went to visit his grave there for the first time a few years back.

A few great old photos:

Grandma in the Aussie army:

2671843937_30152202ae_o.jpg

Grandpa (on left) on R&R break down under:

2671843803_fbd383ab4c_o.jpg

Grandpa (left) and other officers when they were stationed in Alabama in the 1960s

2672664128_07cdaa3a76_o.jpg

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My grandparents on my mother's side lived in Holland during the war and my Opa would talk about the things they had to do to get by (tearing up railway tracks for fuel to burn) but didn't often mention the more grisly experiences.

I guess we all have a very general feel for the depths to which humanity can plunge but when you see it first hand I would guess it's a profoundly different thing

My Opa fought in Holland too' date=' he was a POW. He is 96 and still wont really talk about it...he has talk about moving here with his kids and the devastation following a war.

Where did your grandparents settle in Canada? (I assume they moved to Canada?)[/quote']

St. Jean, QC

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